Sunday, November 16, 2014

The Bible of Pizza: The Pizza Bible

Tony Gemignani with the Pizza Bible


True story. Tony Gemignani and his wife, Julie are visiting Honolulu for the first time.

We want to take them to lunch to one of our favorite restaurants. I’m thinking an upscale sushi place or maybe seafood dim sum. Something special. “What do you want for lunch?” I ask.

 Without batting an eye, “pizza” he states with a grin. And that is exactly what we ate.

  Tony Gemignani thinks about pizza all the time. He lives pizza. He honors pizza. And now he has put all of that knowledge and passion into a book about pizza called The Pizza Bible

 The  is an extraordinary book which shares his passion and desire about teaching you to make incredible pizza.

This book describes in detail how to recreate many different types of regional styles in your own kitchen. As you may know there are a number of different regional styles of pizza in the United States.

While certainly a melting pot for many ethnic dishes, the United States has allowed pizza to be cultivated and influenced by region. And Tony takes the best of each region showing you how to create that particular pizza.

 With this book Tony has raised the bar in teaching how to make great pizza. As Tony explains, this book is less about actual recipes and “more about inspiring people to master the craft of pizza.”

And he takes these words to heart or more precisely as the tattoos on his hands state simply: “Respect the craft.

”.Tony's Pizza

Tony gives you the tools you need and the ingredients necessary. As any professional chef will tell you a scale is essential to get the exact weights of ingredients. You can keep your measuring spoons in the drawer.

He starts with an equipment check list and then moves into the Master Class Shopping list. He goes into detail on the rationale about using particular tools and ingredients. Pizza maker be warned: the path to pizza perfection takes effort. As with all crafts you wish to master you must be dedicated and tenacious.

And Tony is a task master. He insists you read the first 19 pages before you try a single recipe. His notion is to teach you, then inspire you to create memorable pizzeria style pizza. He provides the steps involved and wants you to share his vision of creating pizzeria quality pizza in your own home. You won’t do this by obtaining ordinary pizza ingredients or tools.

Tony guides you as he would the pizzaioli he mentors at his pizza school or at his rare quality driven, pizza workshops. He encourages you to master each step along the way. He takes you through the techniques of his Master Class.

The best part is that you are sitting right in the front row! There are no short cuts here. As he testifies, anyone can follow a recipe and make reasonable pizza, but if you want to make authentic pizzeria style pizza, you need to follow his lead. And he takes you to pizza possibilities you never imagined. Pizza paradise, if you will. He is with you each phase along the way.


Tony making pizza.

His go-to-flour list is a massive inventory of flours needed to create different types of pizzas.

 The flours range from Harvest King, to King Arthur’s Sir Lancelot and his own Tony’s California flour. He describes each one giving the protein percentage and why it should be used. And he shares the theory of pizza relativity. Simply stated that means making your pizza the best it can by adding touches and variation that will improve the experience.

While he is an expert, Tony realizes there needs to be adjustments and flexibility in creating pizza.

 He gives you his framework for pizza nirvana and it up to you to become your own pizza master. “Tony’s Ten Commandments of Pizza” are his must follow rules for pizza perfection.

 The commandments will help keep you grounded and on task as you go through all of the recipes. Tony takes you on an unprecedented pizza journey in teaching you, how to create various styles of regional pizza.  He shares New York, and New Haven. He gives Chicago Deep dish lessons as well as  how to make Detroit and St. Louis pizza. In addition he gives many pizza secrets for making California Style, Regional Italian, and grilled pizza. Tony has also included a section on focaccia and bread. Tony shares a wealth of pizza knowledge.

 Tony Gemignani has accomplished his mission with The Pizza Bible.

 As Tony explained to me: “I put everything I know about pizza into this book.” If you ever wanted to make pizza like a pizzeria, this book is for you. If you are looking for the inside secrets about pizza, you have just opened the magic doors of pizza knowledge.

 As Peter Reinhart once explained to me, there are two types of pizza: good pizza and great pizza. The same can be said about pizza books. The Pizza Bible is a great pizza book. Check out it out here: The Pizza Bible


Pizza in Honolulu: Pacifico Pizza with Alastair







Neapolitan Pizza in Honolulu..he's going to International Pizza Expo.

Listen to this interview with Alastair Hannmann of Pacifico Pizza and Kaneohe' Boston Pizza. Alastair discusses his inspiration to making piza and why he decided to bring Artisan pizza to Hawaii.

He also  talks about Pizza Expo and the importance of attending the biggest pizza party in the world!

Are you going to Pizza Expo?



 Check it out here: International Pizza Expo.

Saturday, November 15, 2014

Flours, Pizza Dough Recipe and Pizza Questions

A Pot Roast Pizza from Pizza Therapy


Bev writes:

 Albert, I love your original dough recipe (Pizza Therapy Pizza Dough Recipe) but recently, upon your recommendation, bought Caputo OO flour.
(Antimo Caputo 00 Pizzeria Flour (Blue) 20 Lb Repack)

How will that flour change your recipe? The reason I ask is I love how your dough handles. It does not spring back and it was great to roll out and deal with . What will be different with the new flour?

 Also, what is up with this new recipe of yours? What is different about it
 and should I change to it.

 Also, I am having about ten people over for a pizza party. Have not done
 that before and am feeling a little nervous about making a lot of
 different pizzas and feeding everyone. Do you think I could pre-bake the
 crusts for a few minutes to aid in my getting a lot of pizzas out quickly?
 Or what do your recommend how I could pull it all off?

 Please guide me.
 Thanks in advance for your help and expertise.

My Response:

Hi Bev.

First thanks for the support....

Great questions, I will do my best!

I am a big believer in the theory of: if its not broke...don't fix it. That said, if what you are doing regarding pizza works, do not change it! Use the recipe and flour that you are comfortable and tastes best to you.

While I do use Caputo and recommend it, I have found it works best in a very hot oven. Such as when I am grilling pizza in my Mighty Pizza Oven. I have used it with good results in a wood fired oven as well.

For every day pizza in my home oven, I like Harvest King by General Mills...

In Tony Gemiginani's new book (the pizza bible) he talks about 15 different flours!

I say stick with the flour that tastes good to you. Use the flour that you find tastes great and is easy to work with.

Over the last several years, I have modified my dough recipe a bit:

4 cups of flour
1 teaspoon of salt
1 teaspoon of yeast and 1 and 1/2 cups of water.

I make the dough the day before and let it proof in my fridge for a day.

Since I got Ton'ys new book, I plan on trying some of his methods to see what happen. I am sure I will be pleased with the results.

Again, if you are having a pizza party, that is not the time to change the recipe or ingredients. Go with what you have always done. 

Experiment by yourself. I think that is the safest.

I think you could par cook the crust, But I have found the best thing to do is to cook each pizza by itself. If you oven is hot hot hot and you are using a pizza stone (or two) you should be able to get your pizza out fairly quickly...

I hope this answers all of your questions.

Best of luck in your pizza adventures! I know your pizzas will be great.

And stay tuned for more info about Tony's new book: "The Pizza Bible".
I am just finishing up a review...and there will be a contest so maybe you can win one!

BTW: you owe me some pics of your pizza party!

pizza on earth,

albert




Monday, November 10, 2014

Scott Wiener, Scott's Pizza Tours: The Art of the Pizza Box





http://pizzatherapy.comPizza Therapy



 In this video Scott talks about his latest book: The Art of the Pizza Box. Scott runs pizza tours in New York city and has an obsession with pizza. He loves all things pizza and is a true pizza activist! I made a mistake recording this video using my mini Ipad, and used portrait view instead of landscape...Sorry. I learned my lesson....

Get Scott's incredible book, Viva la Pizza!: The Art of the Pizza Box  here:



Best Flour for Pizza

Clint writes:

 Good evening! I have been a Pizza Therapy member for a while but just started
 reading.
 I’ve got a Pieson propane pizza oven (no longer in business) and
 make Forno Bravo’s exact recipe for Neapolitan pizza dough.
My grown kids
 get me Caputo 00 red for my birthday and fathers day. My quest is to find
 a recipe with whatever flour will give my crust more dry chew such as
 Scordato’s in Tucson or Napoli’s in Hoboken.

 I will read up on flour on your posts but appreciate any advice. I use a
 scale so everything is weighed to each recipe (even my meatballs are 80
 grams:).

 Pizza is “The wheel of life” in my mind.

 Thank you in advance.

My response:

Hi Clint,

Thanks for writing.

Honestly, I have no idea about: Scordato’s in Tucson or Napoli’s in Hoboken.
You may want to ask them or as I have done, check out the dumpster in back
of the restaurant!

Caputo (Antimo Caputo Chef's Flour, 2.2 Pound (Pack of 10)) is good flour but I understand you may need a very hot oven to get
great results.
I have used it many times and it has made good pizza....

In Tony Gemignani's new book (The Pizza Bible: The World's Favorite Pizza Styles, from Neapolitan, Deep-Dish, Wood-Fired, Sicilian, Calzones and Focaccia to New York, New Haven, Detroit, and more
(Pages 14 and 15) he talks
about all of the flours he recommends.

And he does recommend using a scale for all pizza dough!

He lists 18 different types of flours for making different types of pizza.

For me, and I am no purist, I always use the flour that tastes the best to
me....

I like Harvest King by General Mills as well as Sir Lancelot by King
Arthur. They are great flours for my purpose...(Tony does mention these
brands in his book)

Tony's book is incredible!

This is absolutely the BEST book on pizza ever written and you may find
the answers you seek...

I hope you find the answer to your quest and if you do, please share it
with me!

Here's to all of your pizza adventures and keep me in the loop!


pizza on earth,

albert

Check out Tony's great book, below...

Saturday, November 08, 2014

Thrillist Best Pizza in Fifty States: Hawaii





Best Pizza in Hawaii? There was only one logical choice! Inferno's Wood fire Pizza, 1344 Kona Street, Honolulu, Hawaii

Sunday, October 26, 2014

Pizza: A Slice of American History Review





Barrett discusses Neapolitan and New York style pizza. She opens with the history of pizza and the differences between AVPN, New York, Tomato Pie and New Haven Apizza (Ah-beets). Sprinkled throughout the book are sketches of pizza luminaries such as Penny Pollack (Everybody Loves Pizza), Mark Bello (Pizza A Casa), Roberto Caporuscio (Don Antonio by Starita), Peter Reinhart (American Pie) and Adam Kuban (Slice).

Each type of American pie is described and dissected. She covers Detroit, St. Louis, California, Sicilian and Grandma style pizzas. Barrett’s pizza knowledge is extensive and she has a unique gift to distill the information into delectable slices. As an added benefit recipes for most styles are included. This makes this a true hands on volume as the recipes can be replicated by the home pizza chef. You can learn not only the history of each type of pie but also how to make it with step by step instructions.

She even added to the knowledge base of pizza by describing Pizza Strips created by Rhode Island Italian bakeries and found throughout the “Ocean State”. These were slices of pizza I enjoyed growing up and have only found them in that region. The pictures included are a wonderful addition and fit in nicely with the character of the book. The images are impressive and create a brilliant visual history of pizza. You will discover some rarities which are true nuggets of the pizza saga.

For anyone who loves pizza, this book will fit nicely on your library shelf. Some of the topics are brushed over, but understanding the depth of the subject matter, that is not an issue. I would have liked to have seen a discussion on the strong influence of the Internet on Pizza, but maybe that can be included in a volume of the Complete Encyclopedia of Pizza.





Friday, October 24, 2014

The Pizza Bible Book Signing by Tony Gemignani





Claim your copy of The Pizza Bible. Tony explained to me he put everything he knows about pizza in The Pizza Bible. From New York to New Haven. From Detroit to San Francisco and everything in between. Discover pizza secrets with The Pizza Bible! 



Claim your copy of Tony's great book:

The Pizza Bible: The World's Favorite Pizza Styles, from Neapolitan, Deep-Dish, Wood-Fired, Sicilian, Calzones and Focaccia to New York, New Haven, Detroit, and more



Wednesday, October 01, 2014

Pizza, A Slice of American History by Pizza Therapy

One day in the near future The Complete Encyclopedia of Pizza will be published. This distinguished work will contain at least 150 volumes and will explain in detail the impact pizza has had in America and the known universe. 

 There will be a volume on every type of pizza, including New Haven, New York, Chicago, California, Old Forge, Detroit and much more. Some volumes will be dedicated to those influential pizzaioli such as Frank Pepe, Salvatore Consiglio, Jonathan Goldsmith, John Arena, Peter Reinhart, Ike Sewell, Dom Demarco and Ed Ladue to mention but a few.

 Until the Encyclopedia of Pizza is completed, you will be more than satisfied to discover Liz Barrett’s: Pizza, A Slice of American History. This volume covers numerous types of pizza in America, those persons who influenced the regional pizza and how the various styles developed.

 As a student of pizza, I was somewhat skeptical how one book could explain the history of pizza in America and the various styles included. My fears were immediately laid to rest when I started reading the introduction by pizza activist, Scott Wiener.

  Barrett discusses Neapolitan and New York style pizza. She opens with the history of pizza and the differences between AVPN, New York, Tomato Pie and New Haven Apizza (Ah-beets). Sprinkled throughout the book are sketches of pizza luminaries such as Penny Pollack (Everybody Loves Pizza), Mark Bello (Pizza A Casa), Roberto Caporuscio (Don Antonio by Starita), Peter Reinhart (American Pie) and Adam Kuban (Slice). Each type of American pie is described and dissected. She covers Detroit, St. Louis, California, Sicilian and Grandma style pizzas.

 Barrett’s pizza knowledge is extensive and she has a unique gift to distill the information into delectable slices. As an added benefit recipes for most styles are included. This makes this a true hands on volume as the recipes can be replicated by the home pizza chef. You can learn not only the history of each type of pie but also how to make it with step by step instructions.

 She even added to the knowledge base of pizza by describing Pizza Strips created by Rhode Island Italian bakeries and found throughout the “Ocean State”. These were slices of pizza I enjoyed growing up and have only found them in that region.

 The pictures included are a wonderful addition and fit in nicely with the character of the book. The images are impressive and create a brilliant visual history of pizza. You will discover some rarities which are true nuggets of the pizza saga.

 For anyone who loves pizza, this book will fit nicely on your library shelf. Some of the topics are brushed over, but understanding the depth of the subject matter, that is not an issue. I would have liked to have seen a discussion on the strong influence of the Internet on Pizza, but maybe that can be included in a volume of  the Complete Encyclopedia of Pizza.

 This is a well written volume for anyone who ever held a slice. Grab your own copy, and discover the wonders of “a magical little disk that makes things happen”. You will encounter with this book how pizza is very much a part of the fabric of America. Pizza, is A Slice of American History.

Claim your own copy, right here: Pizza, A Slice of American History


 Claim